Calcitriol

(kal si trye' ole)

P  - Contraindicated in pregnancy

L  - Contraindicated in lactation

Molecule Info

 
Indication & Dosage Oral
Hyperparathyroidism in renal failure
Adult: 0.25 mcg daily or every other day. May increase by 0.25 mcg daily at intervals of 4-8 wk.
Child: 0.25-2 mcg daily with haemodialysis. 
Oral
Hypoparathyroidism/pseudohypoparathyroidism
Adult: 0.5-2 mcg once daily.
Child: 1-5 yr: 0.25-0.75 mcg once daily; >6 yr: 0.5-2 mcg once daily. 
Oral
Vitamin D-resistant rickets (familial hypophosphataemia)
Adult: 0.015-0.02 mcg/kg once daily. Maintenance: 0.03-0.06 mcg/kg once daily. Max: 2 mcg once daily.
Child: 0.015-0.02 mcg/kg once daily. Maintenance: 0.03-0.06 mcg/kg once daily. Max: 2 mcg once daily.
Oral
Hypocalcaemia in premature infants
Child: 1 mg once daily for 5 days.
Intravenous
Hyperparathyroidism in dialysis patients
Adult: 0.5-4 mcg 3 times/wk, increased if needed in steps of 0.25-0.5 mcg at intervals of 2-4 wk; max. 8 mcg 3 times/wk. 
Child: 1 mcg once daily.
Intravenous
Hyperparathyroidism in renal failure
Adult: 0.5 mcg daily 3 times/wk if undergoing haemodialysis. If necessary, dose can be increased by 0.25-0.5 mcg at intervals of 2-4 wk. Maintenance: 0.5-3 mcg 3 times/wk.
Intravenous
Hypocalcaemic tetany in premature infants
Child: 0.05 mcg/kg once daily for 5-12 days.
Administration May be taken with or without food. May be taken w/ meals to reduce GI discomfort.
Overdosage Symptoms include hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria and hyperphosphatemia. Treatment: Immediate discontinuation of calcitriol therapy, institute low-calcium diet and withdraw calcium supplements. Determine serum calcium levels daily until normocalcaemia returns.
Contraindications Hypercalcaemia; evidence of vitamin D toxicity. Pregnancy (dose exceeding RDA). Lactation.
Special Precautions Idiopathic hypercalcaemia. Pediatric doses must be individualised and monitored under close medical supervision. Coronary disease, renal function impairment and arteriosclerosis, especially in the elderly. Hypoparathyroidism.
Adverse Drug Reactions Weakness; headache; somnolence; nausea; vomiting; dry mouth; constipation; muscle pain; bone pain; metallic taste; polyuria; polydipsia; anorexia; irritability; weight loss; nocturia; mild acidosis; reversible azotemia; generalized vascular calcification; nephrocalcinosis; conjunctivitis (calcific); pancreatitis; photophobia; rhinorrhoea; pruritus; hyperthermia; decreased libido; elevated BUN; albuminuria; hypercholesterolaemia; elevated AST and ALT; ectopic calcification; hypertension; cardiac arrhythmias.
Drug Interactions Hypermagnesaemia may develop in patients on chronic renal dialysis. Hypercalcaemia in patients on digitalis may precipitate cardiac arrhythmias. Intestinal absorption of calcitriol may be reduced by cholestyramine and colestipol. Phenytoin, barbiturates may decrease the T1/2 of calcitriol. May develop hypercalcaemia with thiazide diuretics. Please consult detailed drug interactions before prescribing.
Pregnancy Category (US FDA) Category C: Either studies in animals have revealed adverse effects on the foetus (teratogenic or embryocidal or other) and there are no controlled studies in women or studies in women and animals are not available. Drugs should be given only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the foetus.
Storage Intravenous: Store at 25°C. Do not freeze. Oral: Store at 15-30°C. Protect from light.
Pharmacology Calcitriol promotes calcium absorption in the intestines and retention at the kidneys thus increasing serum calcium levels. It also increases renal tubule phosphate resorption consequently decreasing serum phosphatase levels, PTH levels and bone resorption.
Absorption: Well absorbed from the GI tract.
Excretion: Mainly excreted in the bile and faeces.
ATC Classification D05AX03 - calcitriol; Belongs to the class of other topical agents used in the treatment of psoriasis. 
A11CC04 - calcitriol; Belongs to the class of vitamin D and analogues. Used as dietary supplements.

Brand/Product Info


Total Products : 9         
Brand Name Manufacturer/Marketer Composition Dosage Form Pack Size & Price
CALCITROL LICAP Square Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Calcitriol 0.25 mcg Licap 3x10's: 300.90 MRP
CALOREN I/V ACI Ltd. Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxy-chole-calciferol) 1mcg/1ml Injection 1ml amp: 155.58 IP
CALTROL Pacific Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxy-chole-calciferol) 0.25mcg Capsule 30's: 300.00 MRP
Colitrol 0.25 Incepta Pharmaceuticals Limited Calcitriol 0.25 mcg Capsule 10x3's:MRP 300 Tk
Colitrol Injection Incepta Pharmaceuticals Limited Calcitriol 1 mcg/ml Injection Injection 1x1's:MRP 155 Tk
DICALTROL Drug International Ltd Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxy-chole-calciferol) 0.25mcg Capsule 50's: 350.00 MRP
LIQUICAL Beacon Pharmaceuticals Limited Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxy-chole-calciferol) 0.25mcg Capsule 30's: 300.00 MRP
LUCENT SG Renata Limited Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxy-chole-calciferol) 0.25mcg Capsule 30's: 300.00 MRP
ROCALTROL Roche Bangladesh Limited Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxy-chole-calciferol) 0.25mcg Capsule 30's: 420.0 MRP

Gen. MedInfo

Why is this medication prescribed?

Calcitriol is a form of vitamin D that is used to treat and prevent low levels of calcium in the blood of patients whose kidneys or parathyroid glands (glands in the neck that release natural substances to control the amount of calcium in the blood) are not working normally. Low blood levels of calcium may cause bone disease. Calcitriol is in a class of medications called vitamins. It works by helping the body to use more of the calcium found in foods or supplements.

How should this medicine be used

Calcitriol comes as a capsule and a solution (liquid) to take by mouth. It usually is taken once a day or once every other day in the morning with or without food. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take calcitriol exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of calcitriol and may gradually increase your dose, not more than once every 2 to 8 weeks.

Calcitriol may help to control your condition but will not cure it. Continue to take calcitriol even if you feel well. Do not stop taking calcitriol without talking to your doctor.

Other uses for this medicine

Calcitriol is also sometimes used to treat rickets (softening and weakening of bones in children caused by lack of vitamin D), osteomalacia (softening and weakening of bones in adults caused by lack of vitamin D), and familial hypophosphatemia (rickets or osteomalacia caused by decreased ability to break down vitamin D in the body). Calcitriol is also sometimes used to increase the amount of calcium in the blood of premature (born early) babies. Talk to your doctor about the risks of using this medication for your condition.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special precautions should I follow?

 Before taking calcitriol,

  • tell your doctor if you are allergic to calcitriol, other forms of vitamin D such as calcifediol, dihydrotachysterol, doxercalciferol, ergocalciferol, paricalcitol or any other medications or vitamins.
  • tell your doctor what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking, especially antacids; calcium supplements; cholestyramine; colestipol; digoxin ; diuretics ('water pills') ketoconazole (Nizoral); lanthanum; laxatives; oral steroids such as dexamethasone, methylprednisolon), and prednisone; other forms of vitamin D; phenobarbital; phenytoin and sevelamer. Also tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking ergocalciferol or have stopped taking it in the past few months.Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • you should know that many nonprescription medications are not safe to take with calcitriol. Ask your doctor before you take any nonprescription medications while you are taking calcitriol.
  • tell your doctor if you have recently had surgery or are unable to move around for any reason and if you have or have ever had kidney or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking calcitriol, call your doctor. You should not breast-feed while you are taking calcitriol.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking calcitriol.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Calcitriol will work only if you get the right amount of calcium from the foods you eat. If you get too much calcium from foods, you may experience serious side effects of calcitriol, and if you do not get enough calcium from foods, calcitriol will not control your condition. Your doctor will tell you which foods are good sources of these nutrients and how many servings you need each day. If you find it difficult to eat enough of these foods, tell your doctor. In that case, your doctor can prescribe or recommend a supplement.

If you are being treated with dialysis (process of cleaning the blood by passing it through a machine), your doctor may also prescribe a low-phosphate diet. Follow these directions carefully.

If you do not have kidney disease, you should drink plenty of fluids while taking calcitriol. If you have kidney disease, talk to your doctor about how much fluid you should drink each day.

What should I do if I forget a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Some side effects can be serious. The following symptoms are uncommon, but if you experience any of them, call your doctor immediately:
  • weakness

  • headache

  • sluggishness

  • upset stomach

  • vomiting

  • dry mouth

  • constipation

  • muscle pain

  • bone pain

  • metallic taste in mouth

  • increased thirst

  • decreased appetite

  • weight loss

  • increased urination (especially at night)

  • difficult or painful urination

  • changes in vision

  • lack of interest in the things around you

  • hallucination (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist)

  • fever or chills

  • stomach pain

  • pale, fatty stools

  • yellowing of the skin or eyes

  • runny nose

  • decreased sexual desire

  • irregular heartbeat

  • rash

  • hives

  • itching

  • difficulty breathing or swallowing

 What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Protect this medication from light. Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

In case of emergency/overdose

In case of overdose, consult your doctor. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, consult local medical emergency services.

Symptoms of overdose may include:

  • weakness

  • headache

  • sluggishness

  • ups et stomach

  • vomiting

  • dry mouth

  • constipation

  • muscle pain

  • bone pain

  • metallic taste in mouth

  • increased thirst

  • decreased appetite

  • weight loss

  • increased urination (especially at night)

  • difficult or painful urination

  • changes in vision

  • lack of interest in the things around you

  • hallucination (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist)

  • fever or chills

  • stomach pain

  • pale, fatty stools

  • yellowing of the skin or eyes

  • runny nose

  • decreased sexual desire

  • irregular heartbeat

What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your response to this medicine.

Do not let anyone else use your medication. If you still have symptoms and need further treatment, consult your doctor.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

 


This information is provided for reference only and not a replacement for and should only be used in conjunction with full consultation with a registered medical practitioner. It may not contain all the available information you require and cannot substitute professional medical care, nor does it take into account all individual circumstances. Although great effort has been made to ensure content accuracy, mph-bd shall not be held responsible or liable for any claims or damages arising from the use or misuse of the information contained herein, its contents or omissions, or otherwise.