Aspirin [Acetyl Salicylic Acid (ASA)]

(as' pir in)

PCI / LCI - Contraindicated in pregnancy and lactation

Molecule Info

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Indication(s) & Dosage

Aspirin is used to relieve the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and certain other rheumatologic conditions. Low-dose aspirin is used to reduce fever and to relieve mild to moderate pain from headaches, menstrual periods, arthritis, colds, toothaches, and muscle aches. It is also used to prevent heart attacks in people who have had a heart attack in the past or who have angina as well as to reduce the risk of death in people who are experiencing or who have recently experienced a heart attack, to prevent ischemic strokes or mini-strokes in people who have had this type of stroke or mini-stroke in the past.  Aspirin will not prevent hemorrhagic stroke.

Prophylaxis of myocardial infarction  Adult: 75-325 mg once daily orally.  Lower doses should be used in patients receiving ACE inhibitors. Stent implantation  Adult: 325mg 2hr before procedure followed by 160-325 mg/day orally thereafter.  Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis Child: 80-100mg/kg orally daily in 5 or 6 divided doses.  Up to 130 mg/kg daily in acute exacerbations if necessary. Mild to moderate pain and fever  Adult: 325-650mg orally repeated every 4-6 hr according to response.  Max: 4 g/day.  May also be given rectally.  Max Dosage: Pain and inflammation associated with musculoskeletal and joint disorders  Adult: Initial: 2. 4-3. 6 g/day orally in divided doses.  Usual maintenance: 3. 6-5. 4 g/day.  Monitor serum concentrations.

Administration

May be taken with or without food.  May be taken w/ meals to minimise GI discomfort.  Do not take w/ antacids, Fe or dairy products.

Overdosage

Symptoms may include hyperventilation, fever, restlessness, ketosis, and respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis.  CNS depression may lead to coma; CV collapse and respiratory failure.  In children, drowsiness and metabolic acidosis commonly occur; hypoglycaemia may be severe.

Contraindications

Hypersensitivity, active peptic ulceration; pregnancy, children <12 yr, patients with haemophilia or haemorrhagic disorders, gout, severe renal or hepatic impairment, lactation.

Warnings

Reye's syndrome: Children and teenagers should not use this medicine for chicken pox or flu symptoms before a doctor is consulted about Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious illness reported to be associated with aspirin.

Allergy alert: Aspirin may cause a severe allergic reaction which may include:

  • hives 
  • facial swelling 
  • asthma (wheezing) 
  • shock

Special Precautions

History of peptic ulcer or those prone to dyspepsia and those with gastric mucosal lesion, asthma or allergic disorders, dehydrated patients, uncontrolled hypertension, impaired renal or hepatic function, elderly.

Adverse Drug Reaction(s)

GI disturbances; prolonged bleeding time, rhinitis, urticaria and epigastric discomfort; angioedema, salicylism, tinnitus; bronchospasm. Potentially Fatal: Gastric erosion, ulceration and bleeding; severe, occasionally fatal exacerbation of airway obstruction in asthma; Reye's syndrome.  Hepatotoxicity; CNS depression which may lead to coma; CV collapse and resp failure; paroxysmal bronchospasm and dyspnoea.

Drug Interactions

Alcohol, corticosteroids, analgin, phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone may increase risk of GI ulceration.  Aspirin increases phenytoin levels.  May antagonize actions of uricosurics and spironolactone.  

Potentially Fatal: May potentiate effects of anticoagulants, methotrexate and Oral   hypoglycaemics.

Food Interaction

Vitamin-rich foods increase urinary excretion.

Lab Interference

Interferes with thyroid function tests.

Pregnancy Category (FDA)

Category C: Either studies in animals have revealed adverse effects on the foetus and there are no controlled studies in women or studies in women and animals are not available.  Drugs should be given only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the foetus.

Category D: If full-dose used in 3rd trimester. There is positive evidence of human foetal risk, but the benefits from use in pregnant women may be acceptable despite the risk.

Pharmacology

As the active ingredient in aspirin, acetylsalicylic acid works by inhibiting several different chemical processes within the body, including the natural physiological processes causing pain and inflammation.Aspirin relieves pain by inhibiting production of chemicals called prostaglandins, aspirin works to diminish the body's response to a chain of chemical processes that eventually leads to pain. This mechanism of action works on a cellular level.

Aspirin is an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic.  It inhibits cyclooxygenase, which is responsible for the synthesis of prostaglandin and thromboxane.  It also inhibits platelet aggregation. Duration: 4-6 hr.  Absorption: Rapidly absorbed from the GI tract; less reliable; absorbed through the skin.  Peak plasma concentrations after 1-2 hr.  Distribution: Widely distributed; crosses the placenta; enters breast milk.  Protein-binding: 80-90%.  Metabolism: Hepatic; converted to metabolites.  Excretion: Via urine by glomerular filtration, active renal tubular secretion and passive tubular reabsorption; via haemodialysis; 15-20 minutes.

 

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Brand/Product Info


Total Products : 16                
Brand Name Manufacturer/Marketer Composition Dosage Form Pack Size & Price
ANGIN Pharmadesh Laboratories Limited Aspirin 75mg Tablet 100's: 50.00 MRP
ASORIN-75 Kemiko Pharmaceuticals Ltd Aspirin 75mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 50.00 MRP
CAID Jayson Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Aspirin 75mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 37.00 MRP
CARVA 75 Square Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Aspirin 75mg Tablet 20x10's: 114.00 MRP
ECOSPRIN The Acme Laboratories Ltd. Aspirin 75mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 50.00 MRP
ECOSPRIN 150 The Acme Laboratories Ltd. Aspirin 150mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 79.50 MRP
ECOSPRIN 300 The Acme Laboratories Ltd. Aspirin 300mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 108.00 MRP
ENCOPRIN LD Medimet Pharmaceuticals Ltd Aspirin 75mg (Low Dose) Tablet 70's: 35.00 MRP
ERAS-75 Unimed & Unihealth Manufacturers Ltd. Aspirin 75mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 50.00 MRP
G-ASPIRIN Gonoshasthaya Pharmaceuticals Ltd Aspirin 100mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 33.00 MRP
G-ASPIRIN 300 Gonoshasthaya Pharmaceuticals Ltd Aspirin 300mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's & 1000's: 21.00 & 210.00 MRP
MONOSPRIN Ziska Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Aspirin 75mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 37.00 MRP
MYSPRIN Pacific Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Aspirin 75mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 50.00 MRP
NEOSPIN Edruc Limited Aspirin 75mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 37.00 MRP
S-PIRIN Navana Pharmaceuticals Limited Aspirin 100mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 50.00 MRP
SOLRIN Opsonin Pharma Limited Aspirin 75mg Tablet (enteric coated) 100's: 50.00 MRP

Gen. MedInfo

 

Why is this medication prescribed?

Prescription aspirin is used to relieve the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and certain other rheumatologic conditions. Nonprescription aspirin is used to reduce fever and to relieve mild to moderate pain from headaches, menstrual periods, arthritis, colds, toothaches, and muscle aches. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent heart attacks in people who have had a heart attack in the past or who have angina.  Nonprescription aspirin is also used to reduce the risk of death in people who are experiencing or who have recently experienced a heart attack.  Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent ischemic strokes or mini-strokes in people who have had this type of stroke or mini-stroke in the past.  Aspirin will not prevent hemorrhagic strokes.  Aspirin is in a group of medications called salicylates.  It works by stopping the production of certain natural substances that cause fever, pain, swelling, and blood clots.

Aspirin is also available in combination with other medications such as antacids, pain relievers, and cough and cold medications.  This monograph only includes information about the use of aspirin alone.  If you are taking a combination product, read the information on the package or prescription label or ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How should this medicine be used?

Prescription aspirin may come as an extended-release tablet.  Nonprescription aspirin comes as a regular tablet, an enteric-coated, delayed-release tablet, a chewable tablet, powder, and a gum to take by mouth and a suppository to use rectally.  Prescription aspirin is usually taken two or more times a day.  Nonprescription aspirin is usually taken once a day to lower the risk of a heart attack or stroke.  Nonprescription aspirin is usually taken every 4 to 6 hours as needed to treat fever or pain.  Follow the directions on the package or prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand.  Take aspirin exactly as directed.  Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than directed by the package label or prescribed by your doctor.

Swallow the extended-release tablets whole with a full glass of water.  Do not break, crush, or chew them.

Swallow the tablets with a full glass of water.

Chewable aspirin tablets may be chewed, crushed, or swallowed whole.  Drink a full glass of water, immediately after taking these tablets.

Ask a doctor before you give aspirin to your child or teenager.  Aspirin may cause Reye's syndrome in children and teenagers, especially if they have a virus such as chicken pox or the flu.

If you have had Oral   surgery or surgery to remove your tonsils in the last 7 days, talk to your doctor about which types of aspirin are safe for you.

Delayed-release tablets begin to work sometime after they are taken.  Do not take delayed-release tablets for fever or pain that must be relieved quickly.

Stop taking aspirin and Consult your doctor if your fever lasts longer than 3 days, if your pain lasts longer than 10 days, or if the part of your body that was painful becomes red or swollen. You may have a condition that must be treated by a doctor.

To insert an aspirin suppository into the rectum, follow these steps:

  1. Remove the wrapper.
  2. Dip the tip of the suppository in water.
  3. Lie down on your left side and raise your right knee to your chest.  
  4. Using your finger, insert the suppository into the rectum, about 1/2 to 1 inch in infants and children and 1 inch in adults.  Hold it in place for a few moments.
  5. Do not stand up for at least 15 minutes.  Then wash your hands thoroughly and resume your normal activities.

Other uses for this medicine

Aspirin is also sometimes used to treat rheumatic fever and Kawasaki disease.  Aspirin is also sometimes used to lower the risk of blood clots in patients who have artificial heart valves or certain other heart conditions and to prevent certain complications of pregnancy.

What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking aspirin,

  • tell your Doctor if you are allergic to aspirin, other medications for pain or fever, tartrazine dye, or any other medications.
  • tell your Doctor what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take.  Be sure to mention any of the following: acetazolamide; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors such as benazepril, captopril, enalapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, moexipril, perindopril,, quinapril, ramipril, and trandolapril; anticoagulants such as warfarin and heparin; beta blockers such as atenolol, labetalol, metoprolol, nadolol, and propranolol; diuretics; medications for diabetes or arthritis; medications for gout such as probenecid and sulfinpyrazone; methotrexate; other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as naproxen; phenytoin; and valproic acid.  Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you more carefully for side effects.
  • if you are taking aspirin on a regular basis to prevent heart attack or stroke, do not take ibuprofen to treat pain or fever without talking to your doctor.  Your doctor will probably tell you to allow some time to pass between taking your daily dose of aspirin and taking a dose of ibuprofen.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had asthma, frequent stuffed or runny nose, or nasal polyps.  If you have these conditions, there is a risk that you will have an allergic reaction to aspirin.  Your doctor may tell you that you should not take aspirin.
  • tell your doctor if you often have heartburn, upset stomach, or stomach pain and if you have or have ever had ulcers, anemia, bleeding problems such as hemophilia, or kidney or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, especially if you are in the last few months of your pregnancy, you plan to become pregnant, or you are breast-feeding.  If you become pregnant while taking aspirin, consult your doctor.  Aspirin may harm the fetus and cause problems with delivery if it is taken during the last few months of pregnancy.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking aspirin.
  • if you drink three or more alcoholic drinks every day, ask your doctor if you should take aspirin or other medications for pain and fever.

What special dietary instructions to follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

What to do if I forget a dose?

If your doctor has told you to take aspirin on a regular basis and you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it.  However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule.  Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Aspirin may cause side effects.  Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • stomach pain
  • heartburn
  • hives
  • rash
  • swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • wheezing or difficulty breathing
  • hoarseness
  • fast heartbeat
  • fast breathing
  • cold, clammy skin
  • ringing in the ears
  • loss of hearing
  • bloody vomit
  • vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • bright red blood in stools
  • black or tarry stools

Some side effects can be serious.  If you experience any of the following symptoms, consult your doctor immediately:

Aspirin may cause other side effects.  Consult your doctor if you experience any unusual problems while you are taking this medication.

What storage conditions are needed for this medicine?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children.  Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture.  Store aspirin suppositories in a cool place or in a refrigerator.  Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed and any tablets that have a strong vinegar smell. Talk to your Doctor/pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

In case of emergency/overdose

In case of overdose, consult your doctor.  If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, immediately consult local medical emergency services.

Symptoms of overdose may include:

  • burning pain in the throat or stomach
  • vomiting
  • decreased urination
  • fever
  • restlessness
  • irritability
  • talking a lot and saying things that do not make sense
  • fear or nervousness
  • dizziness
  • double vision
  • uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body
  • confusion
  • abnormally excited mood
  • hallucination
  • seizures
  • drowsiness
  • loss of consciousness for a period of time

What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor.

If you are taking prescription aspirin, do not let anyone else take your medication.  

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements.  You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital.  It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies. 

Ref: MedlinePlus, U.S. Natl. Library of Medicine

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